Links on User Research

Fill Your Portfolio With Stories

On the trail of exploring our next career move, it’s likely we’ll need to show the path we’ve been on. As part of a design team, that usually means displaying our work.

However, if we didn’t make proper arrangements before we took the job, it’s very likely we can’t show much of our work to anyone. Consultants, contractors, and full-time employees are usually covered (in the US at least, but most other places as well) by a “work for hire” agreement, which means that the people we work for own all the work product we produce.

Wireframes, sketches, and other deliverables are not ours to show. If the final design isn’t publicly visible, such as internal application, there might not be any evidence of what we’ve done.

This puts us in an uncomfortable position when it comes time to show our work to a prospective employer. How do we show what we’re capable of when we don’t have access to our work? What can you put into your portfolio when your work is all locked up? The simple answer: Fill your portfolio with stories.

Fill Your Portfolio With Stories

Customer Journey Maps- A Quick And Dirty Technique To Create Them

A Customer Journey Map (CJM) is a very helpful tool that represents the whole interaction with a product or service in a transparent manner. It clearly points out the strengths and weaknesses of each stage of the interaction – particularly those that affect the user experience. In addition to this, Customer Journey Maps also show the possibilities for improvement. However, creating a Customer Journey Map is a very resource-consuming process. In this article the author introduces to you the approach they took for one of their clients. The technique that we applied allowed them to quickly create a Customer Journey Map in a quick and cost-effective manner.

Customer Journey Maps – A ‘Quick And Dirty’ Technique To Create Them

How Pocket Built a Research Lab for Mobile App Testing in Just a Few Hours

You’re ready to run a user study for your product. You’ve learned how to recruit participants, write an interview guide, interview people, and summarize results. But there’s just one problem: you don’t have access to a research lab. Learn how Pocket built a lightweight research lab for mobile app testing in their office.

How Pocket Built a Research Lab for Mobile App Testing in Just a Few Hours

Top 5 posts at The UX Bookmark in 2012

I wish you, all my readers, a wonderful 2013. These are the five posts which people read the most in 2012.

  1. A huge list of Style Guides and UI Guidelines
  2. Free User Experience books (Interaction design, HCI, web accessibility & Information Architecture)
  3. Download IDEO’s Human Centered Design Toolkit
  4. Ergonomics for Interaction Designers
  5. Mobile Prototyping Essentials

Download the Collective Action Toolkit by frog- Design Thinking in Simple Language

The Collective Action Toolkit (CAT) is a package of resources and activities that enable groups of people anywhere to organize, build trust, and collaboratively create solutions for problems impacting their community. The toolkit provides a dynamic framework that integrates knowledge and action to solve challenges. Designed to harness the benefits of group action and the power of open sharing, the activities draw on each participant’s strengths and perspectives as the group works to accomplish a common goal.

The toolkit emerged from frog’s collaboration with Nike Foundation/Girl Effect on a project where we explored the nature and value of connections for adolescent girls living in extreme poverty in the developing world. Pairing design research and skills development, frog worked with girls around the world to examine their communities and collectively devise solutions for the problems they faced. Inspired by the Girl Effect project, frog went on to create the Collective Action Toolkit to empower groups of change-makers everywhere.

The CAT isn’t a rigid template for problem solving. It’s designed to be flexible and accessible, with an action map and activities arranged into six categories, from building a group, to imagining new ideas, to planning change. The toolkit challenges groups to move beyond discussion to action, continually clarifying their shared goals based on what they learn through the problem-solving process. The result is a holistic approach to help groups tackle issues in their communities.

Collective Action Toolkit

Expressing UX Concepts Visually

Our perception of the world is primarily visual. In fact, according to the article “Seeing Clearly: The Story of the Human Eye,” by Bradford G. Schleifer, we receive 80 percent of the information that enters our brain through our eyes. Thus, it is no surprise that visual communication lets people perceive concepts and ideas most easily.

When we present personas, sitemaps, user flows, wireframes, and other design deliverables to our clients and stakeholders, it is our duty and responsibility to create well-designed deliverables.

Expressing UX Concepts Visually

ESOMAR Guidelines on the Mutual Rights and Responsibilities of Researchers and Clients

The ICC/ESOMAR International Code on Market and Social Research sets out the ethical and professional rules which market researchers must follow. The Code is designed to enhance the public’s confidence in market research by emphasising the rights and safeguards to which they are entitled under this Code, with particular emphasis on the market researcher’s responsibilities when collecting personal information from respondents.

ESOMAR Guidelines on the Mutual Rights and Responsibilities of Researchers and Clients (PDF, 140 kb)

The UX of Co-Design: Experience Principles for Successful Client Workshops

While creating the right methods and activities for planning a client workshop is important, what has been especially fascinating is explicitly crafting the workshop-participant experience and recognizing how the participant experience is connected to the overall project success. Some of the experience principles for co-design workshops with client teams followed at Adaptive Path are:

  • Honor the gathering
  • Establish shared reference
  • Evoke the mission
  • Personalize the purpose
  • Prepare for excellence
  • Plan for productive groups
  • Reveal the forest in the trees
  • Remember the Enterprise
  • Be grateful
  • Bring your piece of the puzzle

The UX of Co-Design: Experience Principles for Successful Client Workshops

Breaking Down the Silos: Usability Practitioners Meet Marketing Researchers

Being a consultant with experience in both traditional marketing research and user experience and usability gives the author a unique perspective on a broad range of issues relating to customer experience. Not only does he have a good idea of what the other discipline does, he is also a practitioner of the other discipline.

However, in attempting to play both roles at once, he often finds that client companies keep these two disciplines locked up in separate silos—usability research within IT and marketing research within the Marketing Services department. This can have a serious impact on the sharing of information relating to customer experience.

Breaking Down the Silos: Usability Practitioners Meet Marketing Researchers

Sketchnote Army- a Sketchnotes Showcase

Sketchnote Army is dedicated to finding and showcasing sketchnotes and sketchnoters from around the world- from events, conferences, workshops or wherever sketchnotes are captured or created. If you want your sketchnotes to be featured there, you can send your sketchnotes URL and info to the webmaster.

Sketchnote Army