Articles & research papers

User Research

How Accurate are UX Metrics From Online Panels

Online panels are a major source of participants for both market research and UX research studies. This article looks at the accuracy and variability of estimates from online panels and offers takeaways such as:

  1. UX metric estimates vary, but not as much as expected
  2. How precise do you need to be? For some studies, a 3% to 20% amount of uncertainty (on top of sampling error) is enough accuracy; in other cases, differing by 10%, 5%, or even 3% can mean making different decisions. Know how much uncertainty you can tolerate.
  3. Don’t change panels. Continuing the recommendation from the earlier research: Pick a panel and stick with it when tracking data over time, such as likelihood to recommend a product or brand attitudes. Differences between panels can in many cases exceed real differences in the population.

How Accurate are UX Metrics From Online Panels

Design Census- A Survey by Google and AIGA To Check Salaries and More

Google and AIGA have released survey results of their first annual Design Census—an open and collaborative resource for you to important things like gauge design salaries, benefits, working hours and job satisfaction. It offers meaningful filters like location, job type, seniority levels, industry and more.

Design Census

Consumer Barometer- Understand For Free How People Use Internet in Different Countries

The Consumer Barometer from Google is a free tool to help you understand how people use the Internet across the world.

Data in the Consumer Barometer is pulled from two sources – the core Consumer Barometer questionnaire, which is focused on the adult online population, and Connected Consumer Study, which seeks to enumerate the total adult population and is used to weight the Consumer Barometer results.

Consumer Barometer

Digital Research Tools

This wiki collects information about tools and resources that can help scholars (particularly in the humanities and social sciences) conduct research more efficiently or creatively.  Whether you need software to help you manage citations, author a multimedia work, or analyze texts, Digital Research Tools will help you find what you’re looking for. They provide a directory of tools organized by research activity, as well as reviews of select tools in which we not only describe the tool’s features, but also explore how it might be employed most effectively by researchers.

Digital Research Tools

 

Happy New Year! These Were the Most Popular Posts of 2015

As the curator and creator of The UX Bookmark, I would like to wish you all a blessed 2016! 2015 has been a good year for me and I hope it was for you too. Get out there and chase your dreams. Be true to yourself and live in the now.

Here is what was read the most on The UX Bookmark in 2015. You might have read some of them. Read the rest. Enjoy!

  1. A huge list of Style Guides and UI Guidelines
  2. Ultimate guide to table UI patterns
  3. Charting application alternatives to using Excel
  4. Download IDEO’s Human Centered Design Toolkit
  5. Useful Visio Macros

Inside User Research at YouTube

If you think about watching a video online, it may seem pretty easy. A player, a play/pause button and some content. Done. But what about if the video is being played on a mobile phone? Or on a big screen? What if it’s being viewed in Nairobi? Or Shanghai? Now let’s say it’s being viewed by someone who wants to share her thoughts on the video and by someone who wants to do nothing more than watch more videos. Before you know it, watching a video becomes more complicated than you realize.

Enter user research. While far from providing all the answers, it can help illuminate how the site is actually used — as opposed to guessing how it might be used or assuming the user is just like the people designing the site.

Inside User Research at YouTube

Design at Facebook

Facebook’s design team walks the author through their philosophy and approach to designing for a quarter billion users. In particular, they emphasized the importance of writing code, sharing designs early and often, being involved with a project from start to finish, and not falling in love with your work. Making sure designers are technical enough to write code came up a lot.

This is an article from 2009.

Design at Facebook

5 Questions To Answer Before Measuring Anything

We measure more than just usability. We work with clients to measure everything from delight, loyalty, brand affinity, luxury, quality and even love.

While all of these concepts are related, they each measure slightly different aspects of the customer experience. Before measuring anything, especially a construct that’s not well defined or used in practice, we answer these five questions:

  1. How is this being measured already?
  2. What will we compare this to?
  3. How reliable and valid are the measures?
  4. How precise do we need to be?
  5. What will we do with the results?

5 Questions To Answer Before Measuring Anything

Education in HCI

The HCI Education page is a collection of resources for students and educators interested in Human-Computer Interaction. The following are key resources for HCI Education:

  1. Curriculum: The SIGCHI Curriculum Development Group report Curricula in Human-Computer Interaction.
  2. Affordable Textbook: Clayton Lewis and John Rieman’s shareware book Task-Centered User Interface Development.
  3. Readings: Gary Perlman’s Suggested Readings in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), User Interface (UI) Development & Human Factors (HF).
  4. Educator’s Mailing List: The SIGCHI Mailing List: CHI-Educators (chi-educators-request@acm.org) CHI-Educators is archived on the Web
  5. Student’s Mailing List: The SIGCHI Mailing List: CHI-Students (chi-students-request@acm.org) CHI-Students is archived on the Web
  6. Program Ratings: Because it is so often asked, I have created: Gary Perlman’s Ratings of HCI Education Programs

Education in HCI

Personas Make Users Memorable for Product Team Members

A persona is a fictional, yet realistic, description of a typical or target user of the product. A persona is an archetype instead of an actual living human, but personas should be described as if they were real people.

When based on user research, personas support user-centered design throughout a project’s life cycle by making characteristics of key user segments more salient.

Personas work because designers and developers have the same tendency as all other people to be captivated more by concrete instances than by abstractions and generalizations. We need all product-team members to empathize with users and be willing to go the extra step to develop something that will work for the actual users. But if users are described in statistical terms and as broad profiles, that information will simply not lodge itself as deeply in team members’ brains as a distinct persona will.

Personas Make Users Memorable for Product Team Members