Links on User Experience

What is the Deep-Dive Brainstorming technique?

Deep-Dive™ is the name of a technique used to rapidly immerse a group or team into a situation for problem solving or idea creation. This approach is often used for brainstorming product or process development.

Originally developed by the IDEO group (a learning design company) for rapid product development, the Deep-Dive technique is now widely and increasingly used for innovation not only in product development, but process improvement and customer service strategies. The method used by IDEO was documented by Andy Boynton and Bill Fischer (of International Institute of Management Development (IMD) business school), who latterly further enhanced the process and sold the rights to Deloitte Consulting in 2006.

What is the Deep-Dive Brainstorming technique?

Breaking Down the Silos: Usability Practitioners Meet Marketing Researchers

Being a consultant with experience in both traditional marketing research and user experience and usability gives the author a unique perspective on a broad range of issues relating to customer experience. Not only does he have a good idea of what the other discipline does, he is also a practitioner of the other discipline.

However, in attempting to play both roles at once, he often finds that client companies keep these two disciplines locked up in separate silos—usability research within IT and marketing research within the Marketing Services department. This can have a serious impact on the sharing of information relating to customer experience.

Breaking Down the Silos: Usability Practitioners Meet Marketing Researchers

Sketchnote Army- a Sketchnotes Showcase

Sketchnote Army is dedicated to finding and showcasing sketchnotes and sketchnoters from around the world- from events, conferences, workshops or wherever sketchnotes are captured or created. If you want your sketchnotes to be featured there, you can send your sketchnotes URL and info to the webmaster.

Sketchnote Army

People & participation- a participatory methods website

‘People & participation’ is based on Involve’s successful book by the same name which was launched in 2005. The book provides a useful summary of participatory methods and practice but given the number of methods and speed of the development of new methods, it is impossible for a printed publication to stay accurate for long.

The reason for transferring ‘People & participation’ to the web is to allow the creators to maintain more, and more up to date information about participation. It also allows use the site user to add their knowledge and experience making the site a truly collaborative experience, something that a book simply cannot do.

People & participation

5 simple steps towards a UX portfolio

The author shares some nice points on how to work towards creating a good UX portfolio, based on what he learned by attending a meetup at London IA that was focused on the theme, ‘What makes a great UX portfolio’.

5 simple steps towards a UX portfolio

The Sketchnotes Channel at Core77

The Sketchnotes channel allows one to learn more about sketchnotes, including a great overview of a new kind of visual thinking and some basics to get started off.

The Core77 Sketchnotes channel

Will Ford learn that software isn’t manufactured?

A recent article in the New York Times discusses Ford’s plummeting fall in user rankings this year, focusing the blame on their new touch screen interface. According to the article, J.D.Power, the auto industry arbiter, dropped Ford’s ranking from 5th to 23rd, and subsidiary Lincoln’s ranking from 8th to 17th place.

J.D.Power acknowledges that both Ford and Lincoln’s fit and finish are excellent. It was the “annoying” behavior of their driver-facing interactive systems that caused their ratings to plummet. Other reviewers concur, as Consumer Reports yanked their “Recommended” rating from Ford’s new 2011 Edge model.

… Digital solutions are so much cheaper and more flexible than mechanical ones that they will eventually come to dominate the entire company. Companies who can master the challenge of software’s unique nature, and particularly of how humans interact with it, will thrive. Ford is learning the opposite lesson.

Will Ford learn that software isn’t manufactured?

High Paying Jobs in User Experience Design

Here are top paying jobs for Information Architecture, Usability, and UX practitioners plus reasons to explore each for your user experience design career - and bank your account. (Salary figures based on Indeed.com and GlassDoor.com data)

  • User experience strategist: $67,000 to $135,000
  • Usability analyst: $81,000 on an average
  • User interface designer: $84,000 to $155,000
  • Interaction designer: $91,000 on an average
  • Interaction designer: $91,000 on an average
  • Information architect: $104,000 on an average

High paying jobs in User Experience design

Response times- the 3 important limits

The basic advice regarding response times has been about the same for thirty years [Miller 1968; Card et al. 1991]:

  1. 0.1 second is about the limit for having the user feel that the system is reacting instantaneously, meaning that no special feedback is necessary except to display the result.
  2. 1.0 second is about the limit for the user’s flow of thought to stay uninterrupted, even though the user will notice the delay. Normally, no special feedback is necessary during delays of more than 0.1 but less than 1.0 second, but the user does lose the feeling of operating directly on the data.
  3. 10 seconds is about the limit for keeping the user’s attention focused on the dialogue. For longer delays, users will want to perform other tasks while waiting for the computer to finish, so they should be given feedback indicating when the computer expects to be done. Feedback during the delay is especially important if the response time is likely to be highly variable, since users will then not know what to expect.

Response times- the 3 important limits

The Nokia User Experience & Design Resource

The Nokia User Experience resource focuses on the mobile user experience and consists of the following three sections:

Design process
Tips and tools that will help you apply user centered design to your mobile service.
User Experience
Learn what makes good mobile user experience with real-life examples.
Design Library
If you know exactly what platform you’re developing for and want to leap into the details of UI creation, then use this online library to access style guides, regional design guides and other guidelines.

The Nokia User Experience & Design Resource