Links on User Experience

The BBCi Redesign Process- Understanding, Concept & Build

In setting out to redesign the BBCi homepage, the team knew they were tackling a hard task. Many people use and love their homepage, so they knew that any changes we make will evoke a strong reaction. They needed to balance the needs of these users with the needs of their own business. They needed to satisfy a large number of people with a range of different objectives, both inside and outside the BBC. Any solution required them to make decisions, but they believed that they had at least made informed choices to ensure a sensitive evolution of the page.

They wanted to make a clear step change with the design of the page without alienating the users. To begin with they looked at the way people use the current page using click-throughs and the way they feel about it through emotional response testing. They looked at how people build up relationships with the services and objects they use on a daily basis. This helped them address the issues they saw in all elements of the homepage, including the main story.Throughout the process, they benefited from continual user testing and internal feedback.

They believe that the resulting page will feel familiar to their existing users, but through digital patina, balanced design and excellent functionality, they also believed they gave it soul. The Glass Wall which gave them the title of this book was the center of the project. Most of their discussions were visualized on the wall and its location at the entrance to the studio ensured everyone could see what was going on and contribute. This book aims to give some background on the process they followed and covers the redesign from its early stages in May 2002 up until launch in November 2002.

 

The BBCi Redesign Process- Understanding, Concept & Build (PDF, 8mb)

Customer Journey Maps – A ‘Quick And Dirty’ Technique To Create Them

A Customer Journey Map (CJM) is a very helpful tool that represents the whole interaction with a product or service in a transparent manner. It clearly points out the strengths and weaknesses of each stage of the interaction – particularly those that affect the user experience. In addition to this, Customer Journey Maps also show the possibilities for improvement. However, creating a Customer Journey Map is a very resource-consuming process. In this article the author introduces to you the approach they took for one of their clients. The technique that we applied allowed them to quickly create a Customer Journey Map in a quick and cost-effective manner.

Customer Journey Maps – A ‘Quick And Dirty’ Technique To Create Them

Fill Your Portfolio With Stories

On the trail of exploring our next career move, it’s likely we’ll need to show the path we’ve been on. As part of a design team, that usually means displaying our work. However, if we didn’t make proper arrangements before we took the job, it’s very likely we can’t show much of our work to anyone. Consultants, contractors, and full-time employees are usually covered (in the US at least, but most other places as well) by a “work for hire” agreement, which means that the people we work for own all the work product we produce.

Wireframes, sketches, and other deliverables are not ours to show. If the final design isn’t publicly visible, such as internal application, there might not be any evidence of what we’ve done. What can you put into your portfolio when your work is all locked up? The simple answer: Fill your portfolio with stories.

Fill Your Portfolio With Stories

Preference and Desirability Testing: Measuring Emotional Response to Guide Design

An important role of visual design is to lead users through the hierarchy of a design as we intend. For interactive applications, a sense of organization can affect perceived usability and, ultimately, users’ overall satisfaction with the product.

What stakeholders should be able to say is, “We should go with design C over A and B, because I feel it evokes the right kind of emotional response in our audience that is closer to our most important brand attributes.”

The Mobile Playbook from Google

Mobile is more central to business success than ever before. Most executives know this, but they get hung up on exactly what to do and how to do it.

Google’s now second edition of The Mobile Playbook offers the latest best practices and strategies for winning in mobile, like how to address the price transparency challenge and face showrooming head on, the age-old question of when to build a mobile website and when to build a mobile app, and what it really means to build multi-screen marketing campaigns.

The Mobile Playbook

Usability and User Experience Surveys

According to Perlman (2009), “Questionnaires have long been used to evaluate user interfaces (Root & Draper, 1983). Questionnaires have also long been used in electronic form (Perlman, 1985). For a handful of questionnaires specifically designed to assess aspects of usability, the validity and/or reliability have been established, including some in the [table below].”

This wiki has a list of generic usability survey instruments that can be adapted to specific websites. Often, it is good enough to replace the word “system” by “web site”. There are more than 15 questionnaires listed here.

Usability and user experience surveys

Download the Collective Action Toolkit by frog- Design Thinking in Simple Language

The Collective Action Toolkit (CAT) is a package of resources and activities that enable groups of people anywhere to organize, build trust, and collaboratively create solutions for problems impacting their community. The toolkit provides a dynamic framework that integrates knowledge and action to solve challenges. Designed to harness the benefits of group action and the power of open sharing, the activities draw on each participant’s strengths and perspectives as the group works to accomplish a common goal.

The toolkit emerged from frog’s collaboration with Nike Foundation/Girl Effect on a project where we explored the nature and value of connections for adolescent girls living in extreme poverty in the developing world. Pairing design research and skills development, frog worked with girls around the world to examine their communities and collectively devise solutions for the problems they faced. Inspired by the Girl Effect project, frog went on to create the Collective Action Toolkit to empower groups of change-makers everywhere.

The CAT isn’t a rigid template for problem solving. It’s designed to be flexible and accessible, with an action map and activities arranged into six categories, from building a group, to imagining new ideas, to planning change. The toolkit challenges groups to move beyond discussion to action, continually clarifying their shared goals based on what they learn through the problem-solving process. The result is a holistic approach to help groups tackle issues in their communities.

Collective Action Toolkit

Expressing UX Concepts Visually

Our perception of the world is primarily visual. In fact, according to the article “Seeing Clearly: The Story of the Human Eye,” by Bradford G. Schleifer, we receive 80 percent of the information that enters our brain through our eyes. Thus, it is no surprise that visual communication lets people perceive concepts and ideas most easily.

When we present personas, sitemaps, user flows, wireframes, and other design deliverables to our clients and stakeholders, it is our duty and responsibility to create well-designed deliverables.

Expressing UX Concepts Visually

Users Love Simple & Familiar Designs – Why Websites Need to Make a Great First Impression

We form first impressions of the people and things we encounter in our daily lives in an extraordinarily short timeframe. We know the first impression a website’s design creates is crucial in capturing users’ interest. In less than 50 milliseconds, users build an initial “gut feeling” that helps them decide whether they’ll stay or leave. This first impression depends on many factors: structure, colors, spacing, symmetry, amount of text, fonts, and more.

In our study we investigated how users’ first impressions of websites are influenced by two design factors:

  • Visual complexity — how complex the visual design of a website looks
  • Prototypicality — how representative a design looks for a certain category of websites

Users Love Simple & Familiar Designs – Why Websites Need to Make a Great First Impression

Design for mobile first, then desktop

More often than not, the mobile experience for a Web application or site is designed and built after the desktop version is complete.

Here are three reasons why Web applications should be designed for mobile first instead:

  1. Mobile is exploding
  2. Mobile forces you to focus
  3. Mobile extends your capabilities