Links on Information Architecture

DSIA Portal of Information Architecture

The DSIA Portal of Information Architecture provides a public body of knowledge that offers educational and technical content to the general public, business stakeholders, information architects, as well as user experience design practitioners whose responsibilities include or must consider the organizational function of information architecture.

DSIA portal of Information Architecture

Opinion- There Is No Mobile Internet

It’s time to stop thinking about the Internet and online communication in the context of a device, be it desktop, tablet or mobile. Advances by Google and Apple have heightened consumer expectations, which now require stricter focus from us to create seamless online communications — communications that work everywhere and that get their point across. We need to embrace a device-agnostic approach to communicating with connected consumers and forget the idea of a “mobile Internet”. There is only One Web to experience.

There Is No Mobile Internet

The Design Of Effective Online Help In Web Applications

The usability and ultimately the success of web-based services are partly due to effective user support. Although the use of online support tools is now more prevalent in Web applications, these often overwhelm the user with information poorly organized, or are simply ignored (Parush and Kaporovsky Parush, 2001). This paper proposes a guide for the appropriate choice and design of task support tools based on user profiles, tasks and characteristics of help tools.

An increasing number of applications are being developed on the Web, and their usability is considered as being critical for success (Donahue et al., 1999). One important aspect of Web application usability is its capacity to successfully support users while they are completing their tasks. The best way to support users is to provide task support tools that are embedded in the application. Very few guidelines have been proposed to help designers choose the appropriate tools based on users types, needs and tasks.

The main purpose of this paper is to explore the different ways of supporting users electronically, the current trends in task support, and the effectiveness of the different tools available. It provides a guide that could be useful to anyone interested in developing online help to improve the usability of their Web applications.

The Design Of Effective Online Help In Web Applications

Top 5 posts at The UX Bookmark in 2012

I wish you, all my readers, a wonderful 2013. These are the five posts which people read the most in 2012.

  1. A huge list of Style Guides and UI Guidelines
  2. Free User Experience books (Interaction design, HCI, web accessibility & Information Architecture)
  3. Download IDEO’s Human Centered Design Toolkit
  4. Ergonomics for Interaction Designers
  5. Mobile Prototyping Essentials

The Anatomy of a Design Decision

Webstock ’12: Jared Spool – The Anatomy of a Design Decision from Webstock on Vimeo.

What are the habits of highly effective design teams? The best designs come from not one, but hundreds of well-made decisions. The worst designs arise out of hundreds of poorly-made decisions. All that stands between you and a great design is the qualify of your decisions. Where do they come from?

For the last five years, UIE has been studying how designers make their decisions. When do they use outside information, such as research about their users? When do they go with their gut instinct? When do the designers look to past decisions and the lessons they’ve learned?

What they found is interesting. In this presentation, Jared does an entertaining deep dive into the gut instinct of the best designers (without looking at all the gooey parts). You’ll learn five styles of decision making, from Self Design to Experience-focused Design, and which style produces quality results.

Design for mobile first, then desktop

More often than not, the mobile experience for a Web application or site is designed and built after the desktop version is complete.

Here are three reasons why Web applications should be designed for mobile first instead:

  1. Mobile is exploding
  2. Mobile forces you to focus
  3. Mobile extends your capabilities

Best Practices for Designing Faceted Search Filters

Some of the important best practices for designing filters for faceted search results are:

  • Decide on your filter value-selection paradigm—either drill-down or parallel selection
  • Provide an obvious and consistent way to undo filter selection
  • Always make all filters easily available
  • At every step in the search workflow, display only filter values that correspond to the available items, or inventory
  • Provide filter values that encompass all items, or the complete inventory

Best Practices for Designing Faceted Search Filters

Organizing digital information for others

This short free to download ebook explores how lists, categories, trees and facets can be better used to organize information for others. You also learn how metadata and taxonomies can connect different collections and increase the findability of information across the website or intranet.

Organizing digital information for others

Disclosure: I work for the company that released the ebook. None the less, I have included it here because it I think it deserves to be here.

What is the Deep-Dive Brainstorming technique?

Deep-Dive™ is the name of a technique used to rapidly immerse a group or team into a situation for problem solving or idea creation. This approach is often used for brainstorming product or process development.

Originally developed by the IDEO group (a learning design company) for rapid product development, the Deep-Dive technique is now widely and increasingly used for innovation not only in product development, but process improvement and customer service strategies. The method used by IDEO was documented by Andy Boynton and Bill Fischer (of International Institute of Management Development (IMD) business school), who latterly further enhanced the process and sold the rights to Deloitte Consulting in 2006.

What is the Deep-Dive Brainstorming technique?

Five Myths about Taxonomy and SharePoint

Many organizations are finding that leveraging the full suite of capabilities SharePoint offers requires introduction of a new requirement – that of dealing with, managing and exploiting taxonomies. Of course taxonomies are not new, but there is some confusion about where managed metadata services and the term store end and true taxonomy management begins.

There are also some misconceptions about the process of deriving and applying taxonomies in SharePoint. The following are five areas of confusion that we have seen in our engagements and research.

  • Myth 1: SharePoint now has taxonomy management
  • Myth 2: Taxonomy is used as metadata and metadata is an IT problem. Therefore taxonomy is best left to the project’s technical resources
  • Myth 3: Librarians are the best people to handle SharePoint taxonomies
  • Myth 4: SharePoint taxonomies need to be comprehensive and finely grained
  • Myth 5: Taxonomies managed in the in the term store can be used everywhere in the SharePoint application

Five Myths about Taxonomy and SharePoint